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Bees in Arizona

Bee Upclose

Bees, depending on who you talk to, they can bring up all kinds of visions. If you're an engineer, you might envision the workers constructing a honeycomb hive. Someone into Melittology, might envision cataloging all the different species, what they do or how they interact with other parts of nature. Most people; however, will either bring up visions of swarms (usually from old movies or articles they read) or raw honey that honey bees produce.

To date, Apiologist (a person who studies bees) have cataloged over 20,00 different types (including bumblebees and honey bees) and if your out exploring any part of Arizona, there is a good chance that you will come across one of these flying insects.

What Are Bees?

Without getting into the technical details (see resources if interested), bees are flying insects, which range from .08 to 1.54 inches in length. The most common workers are at the smaller end of the spectrum, usually mistaken for wasps (which they are closely related to) and flys, insect predators that include beewolves and dragonflies are the larger types. Most species of bees live socially in colonies, but there are other types of solitary bees.

Why Are Bees Important?

Without getting into the technical details (see resources if interested), bees are flying insects, which range from .08 to 1.54 inches in length. Bee-PollinationThe most common workers are at the smaller end of the spectrum, usually mistaken for wasps (which they are closely related to) and flys, insect predators that include beewolves and dragonflies are the larger types. Most species of bees live socially in colonies, but there are other types of solitary bees.

For clarification on the terms of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 visit there website at Federal Wildlife Service


Acknowledgements

The Bees section was created with special thanks to Louis Juers (Arizona State Parks & Trails) for providing information used in this section. Additional information and digital materials were obtained from some of the following organizations. We would like to thank them for all their dedication and hard work within their profession.


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